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Harassment

Uncategorized

forbesIn an attempt to win a unionization election in Minnesota, SEIU repeatedly harassed a personal care attendant — both in person and over the phone. Fed up with the harassment, the young woman decided to oppose the union.

Holly had just returned home from shopping, when as she escorted her patient inside prior to unloading the groceries she noticed a woman sitting in a parked car in front of the house. As Holly gathered the groceries, the woman got out and approached her: she was well dressed in a white suit and had an accent that indicated that she was not from Minnesota.

The woman identified herself as a SEIU representative, and asked if they could talk for a few minutes. Holly said she didn’t have time right now, but the woman persisted, placing herself between Holly and the front of the door and repeatedly asking her how she intended to vote in the upcoming union election.

Holly became frightened; arms full of groceries, she could hear her patient becoming agitated and distressed inside, and here was this strange woman blocking her way and demanding to know how she would ‘vote.’

Holly finally extricated herself and entered her home slamming the door behind her. But that wasn’t the end of things. Over the next weeks and months, she received multiple calls and visits from the union. I asked Holly how she would characterize the nature of these calls and visits. “Stalking, absolutely,” she told me. “They wouldn’t leave me alone!”

She remembered one of the last calls she received from the union, sometime in late spring of 2014. “I was asking the guy tons of questions,” she told me. “They kept telling me they could do great things for us PCAs, and I wanted specifics but the guy couldn’t give me any straight answers. I felt like he was just trying to guilt me into going for the union. I became fed up and told him that when my ballot came I intended to vote ‘no’ and then I hung up.”

 

forbes

In an attempt to win a unionization election in Minnesota, SEIU repeatedly harassed a personal care attendant — both in person and over the phone. Fed up with the harassment, the young woman decided to oppose the union. Holly had just returned home from shopping, when as she escorted her patient inside prior to unloading the […]

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Newspaper Opposes SEIU-Supported Tax Hike

Uncategorized

press enterpriseThe editorial board of a California newspaper announced its opposition to a cigarette tax hike that SEIU is supporting. The newspaper noted that California’s state revenues are improving which undercuts the rationale for tax hikes. The paper also noted that the poor would be most affected by the $2-per-pack tax hike.

Then there’s a tobacco tax increase proposal by the SEIU California State Council, the California Medical Association and other medical groups to ignite cigarette taxes. Reported the Sacramento Bee, the initiative “would impose a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes to fund health programs that include smoking prevention and Medi-Cal, California’s health insurance program for low-income residents.”

The tax largely would fund programs for the poor; yet the poor would pay for the programs because they form the largest group of smokers. It would raise up to $1.3 billion a year. But as we always warn, boosting cigarette taxes also would increase the black market, which especially afflicts the poor.

If the economy remains this productive, we hope any talk of tax increases next year is snuffed out like a cigarette butt.

press enterprise

The editorial board of a California newspaper announced its opposition to a cigarette tax hike that SEIU is supporting. The newspaper noted that California’s state revenues are improving which undercuts the rationale for tax hikes. The paper also noted that the poor would be most affected by the $2-per-pack tax hike. Then there’s a tobacco […]

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Hemorrhaging Support

Uncategorized

freedom foundationFollowing the Harris v. Quinn decision by the US Supreme Court, an SEIU local in Washington has lost nearly half of its members.

Until the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 30, 2014, decision in Harris v. Quinn, family child care providers in Washington were required to pay union dues or fees to SEIU Local 925 as a condition of serving state-subsidized clients.

In Harris, the court ruled that “partial public employees” — workers paid by the state to provide services to clients eligible for state assistance, but not considered full public employees — could not be constitutionally required to pay any union dues or fees against their will.

According to data from the state Department of Social and Health Services, nearly half of Washington’s approximately 7,000 family child care providers have exercised their newly acknowledged rights and left SEIU 925 since the Harris decision. The percentage of providers paying dues to the union fell from 100 percent in July 2014 to 53.2 percent (3,738) in May 2015.

freedom foundation

Following the Harris v. Quinn decision by the US Supreme Court, an SEIU local in Washington has lost nearly half of its members. Until the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 30, 2014, decision in Harris v. Quinn, family child care providers in Washington were required to pay union dues or fees to SEIU Local 925 as a condition […]

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In Decline

Uncategorized

houston chronicleA Texas SEIU local that consists of janitors has seen its membership decline by over 30% over the past decade. “A decade ago, the union represented 5,300 janitors. But after dropping some buildings during its last round of contract negotiations, the union now represents about 3,500 workers.”

houston chronicle

A Texas SEIU local that consists of janitors has seen its membership decline by over 30% over the past decade. “A decade ago, the union represented 5,300 janitors. But after dropping some buildings during its last round of contract negotiations, the union now represents about 3,500 workers.”

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Abandoning patients

Uncategorized | Latest updates

wamc northeast public radioIn Massachusetts, SEIU members who work in the mental health field abandoned their patients to picket for higher wages.

Hundreds of Western Massachusetts mental health workers are continuing a three-day strike protesting a contract stalemate with a taxpayer-funded social service agency.

Strikes continue for a second day at the offices of Clinical & Support Options, which provides emergency mental health intervention and substance abuse treatment for thousands of children and families. Some 350 front-line clinicians and crisis workers represented by SEIU Local 509 are calling for higher wages and increased benefits, according to union spokesman Jason Stephany…

CSO’s president says the union’s demands are unworkable noting about 90 percent of its budget comes from government sources.

 

wamc northeast public radio

In Massachusetts, SEIU members who work in the mental health field abandoned their patients to picket for higher wages. Hundreds of Western Massachusetts mental health workers are continuing a three-day strike protesting a contract stalemate with a taxpayer-funded social service agency. Strikes continue for a second day at the offices of Clinical & Support Options, which provides […]

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Jobs Likely to be Lost

Uncategorized | Latest updates

washington free beaconAccording to a poll of close to 1,000 New York fast food business owners, over 20% say that they are “very likely” to go out of business if the minimum wage is hiked from $8.75 to $15 an hour as a result of SEIU’s business harassment campaign. Furthermore, prices are likely to rise and hours will likely be reduced.

The Employment Policies Institute, a free market think tank and critic of minimum wage hikes, surveyed nearly 1,000 self-described fast food entrepreneurs about how they would respond to statewide, industry-specific wage hikes. More than 20 percent of respondents said they were “very likely” to go out of business if the state raises the minimum wage for fast food joints to $15, a 70 percent increase from the current $8.75 statewide minimum wage.

Such a hike could spur higher costs for customers and reduced employment opportunities and hours for workers. Business owners responded overwhelmingly that such policies would hurt the very workers that [Democrat Governor Andrew] Cuomo and activists claim to want to help.

Only 5 percent of respondents said they were “unlikely” to raise prices to cope with a $15 wage; 70 percent said they were very likely. In order to retain customers and remain competitive, a majority of the owners said they would be forced to cut employee hours or curb hiring.

“Low single-digit profit margins, which are typical for the fast food industry, explain why business owners in the state report considering a series of off-setting measures to adapt to a $15 minimum wage,” the report says…

The fast food industry has come under increasing scrutiny from labor regulators thanks to public campaigns by the Service Employees International Union, which spent more than $20 million in 2014 on organizing committees that staged protests in cities across the country. The SEIU is also a major supporter of Cuomo, contributing more than $100,000 to him since 2008…

The EPI also found that the size and nature of franchisees skewed toward the traditional definition of small business. About 85 percent of those surveyed reported having fewer than 50 employees, while more than half said they had fewer than 15 workers. Nearly 60 percent reported that their profits were two percent of all revenue after expenses and labor costs.

New York is not the first area that would see fast food joints hiking prices to compensate for high wage laws. San Francisco Subway franchises were forced to abandon the eatery’s famed $5 Footlong campaign because of expensive labor costs.

washington free beacon

According to a poll of close to 1,000 New York fast food business owners, over 20% say that they are “very likely” to go out of business if the minimum wage is hiked from $8.75 to $15 an hour as a result of SEIU’s business harassment campaign. Furthermore, prices are likely to rise and hours […]

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All about the Benjamins

Uncategorized | Latest updates

socialist project

SEIU is looking to get paid for its harassment of McDonald’s.

What is SEIU’s end game? I asked one organizer if the campaign is building working power, and the response was blunt: “The goal is not worker power. It’s a contract.”

socialist project

SEIU is looking to get paid for its harassment of McDonald’s. What is SEIU’s end game? I asked one organizer if the campaign is building working power, and the response was blunt: “The goal is not worker power. It’s a contract.”

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SEIU to Protest Fast Food with Illegal Acts Thursday

Uncategorized | All Categories | Dirty tactics | Latest updates | Shady Lobbying

Service Employees International Union backed Fast Food Forward and SEIU’s Fight for 15 plan a protest strike/walkout, illegal acts Thursday, September 4

15-minimum-wage-replacementThe Service Employees International Union and Fast Food Forward is targeting fast food companies like McDonalds and Burger King with illegal acts, escalating their efforts in their “Fight for 15” $15 minimum wage campaign.  In the lead up to tomorrow’s protest, one worker told The Guardian that the union adopted a motion to do “whatever it takes” to achieve their goal:

“Thirteen-hundred workers unanimously adopted a resolution at our convention in July to do whatever it takes to win $15 an hour and union rights, including participating in non-violent, peaceful protests in the tradition of the civil rights movement.”

Despite the call to nonviolence and reference to the civil rights movement, that has not always been the case when the SEIU has been involved. The SEIU’s history is replete with examples of violent behavior and use of threats to get what they want. In fact, the SEIU was quite friendly with the violent protest organizers of Occupy Wall Street, even offering them free office space.

Meanwhile, according to the New York Times, the SEIU will be using home healthcare workers to artificially increase their numbers:

..this time labor organizers plan to increase the pressure by staging widespread civil disobedience and having thousands of home-care workers join the protests….

Some franchise operators have dismissed the walkout, saying that in previous one-day strikes, only a handful of employees at their restaurants walked out, barely disrupting business.

This attempt to artificially inflate their numbers is certainly not new for the SEIU. Previously, protesters have been caught on video admitting to being paid to protest for the union. Using outside, unassociated union members to escalate visibility and pressure when the real numbers would only amount to a handful is par for the course.

Meanwhile, there is increased concern being voiced about whether these efforts have anything to do with what the SEIU is supposed to be about‒helping their own members achieve better wages and working conditions. The SEIU has spent millions in the fast food area, and there is no clear indication the industry will be unionizing any time soon.

In fact, the SEIU’s efforts may be the worst way to endear themselves to the industry, as well as undermine the very employees they say they want to help. An increase of wages to $15 is more likely to result in fewer jobs for workers, as companies like McDonalds and Burger King turn to automation to replace the handfuls of workers who leave their company to protest.  And the SEIU’s efforts polarize the conversation and add potentially violent disruption to the conversation in tomorrow’s protest may backfire, as did the aims of Occupy Wall Street.

Tomorrow’s protest highlights the disconnect in the SEIU between their goals and their members’ needs. They are willing to spend millions on an artificial movement with no clear benefit to their membership, but aren’t willing to consider the consequences for those they say they want to help. Is it any wonder the SEIU continues to shrink?

15-minimum-wage-replacement

Service Employees International Union backed Fast Food Forward and SEIU’s Fight for 15 plan a protest strike/walkout, illegal acts Thursday, September 4 The Service Employees International Union and Fast Food Forward is targeting fast food companies like McDonalds and Burger King with illegal acts, escalating their efforts in their “Fight for 15” $15 minimum wage […]

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Why Fast Food Workers Should Really Protest – Via NetRightDaily

Uncategorized | Dirty tactics

Today’s article brought to you by Americans for Limited Government’s NetRightDaily blog. By David Bozeman. Originally published Dec. 6, 2013.

Fast food workers, prodded on by a top down effort by union organizers, yesterday protested in many locations demanding a minimum wage of at least $15 an hour and, of course, union representation, among other demands.  Kendall Fells, representing the SEIU-backed Fast Food Forward, immediately cited industry profits to justify his group’s demands.

How revealing that the first remark out of his mouth was the left’s most timeworn cliché.  How sadder still is the economic morale five years into the era of transformation, good will, “stimulus,” hope and change.

Nothing written here is meant to disparage those fast food workers who do indeed struggle between paychecks.  But the pay and preponderance of entry-level service jobs is not the weight on American prosperity, it is the lack of higher-paying positions, many lost in the Great Recession that have not been replaced.

Among other factors, the American economy is saddled with leadership that remains hostile to job creation.  The Obama Administration’s “you didn’t build that” mentality both reflects and eggs on a seething hostility to “evil” corporations and those “lucky” enough to have sustained small business ownership.  Simply, why should businesses invest under conditions hostile not only to their growth but sometimes to their very existence (for instance, the energy producers and the health insurance industry)?

Fortunately, fast food work, even today, is still a transitory means of employment, a field mostly of teenagers, college students and those needing just part-time wages.  Rather than a sentence, a stint at McDonald’s offers pay, experience and a step up.  Those who have to settle for fast food work to support themselves and their families deserve a free and competitive job market.  But, policy aside, what is most heartbreakingly absent today, what those fast food workers need in large doses, is hope.

Read more here: http://netrightdaily.com/2013/12/fast-food-workers-really-protest/ 

mcdonalds-logo-300x290

Today’s article brought to you by Americans for Limited Government’s NetRightDaily blog. By David Bozeman. Originally published Dec. 6, 2013. Fast food workers, prodded on by a top down effort by union organizers, yesterday protested in many locations demanding a minimum wage of at least $15 an hour and, of course, union representation, among other demands.  […]

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SEIU Fights Raises, Except to Disastrous Minimum Wage

Uncategorized | All Categories | Union Mismanagement
The Service Employees International Union, freshly returned from fighting the right of employers to give employees raises, have finally come up with their own proposal for increasing wages for employees- raising the minimum wage:

Raising the minimum wage is an important step toward an economy that works for everyone, not just the richest 1%. That’s why both current elected officials and those who are pursuing elected office need to stand with us in raising the federal minimum wage.

Putting more money into the pockets of ordinary Americans is a no-brainer. If we reduced income inequality, we’d boost our economy. Small businesses would grow and hire, and we’d put the 99% back to work.

Now all of this sounds like a good idea, right? More money in your pocket, better economy, right? Except that historically, this is not the case. In fact, at this point, raising the minimum wage might be the worst thing SEIU could propose for our economy. ALG’s own Rick Manning explains:

Congress passed an increase in the minimum wage in May of 2007, raising it from $5.15 an hour to the current $7.25 an hour in three steps.

The first bump in pay did not cause much damage since it occurred rapidly and the economy was operating at pretty close to full employment. But the second installment of the increase, which went into effect in the summer of 2008, was devastating.

The economy was beginning to slow in the spring of 2008, and thousands of employers independently decided that they could not afford to hire as many summer workers at higher costs. The result: the unemployment rate jumped from 4.9 percent to 5.4 percent in May 2008.

First of all, remember when unemployment was *only* 5%? It’s amazing how, like gas prices, unemployment has steadily increased to the point that the new normal is so out of place with previous expectations. With all of the promises of the Obama campaign, and all of the money the SEIU spent to elect him into office, the economy has yet to objectively improve in terms of bottom line numbers.

Once you get past the lower unemployment, the comparisons between 2008 and 2012 get very interesting. With the Obamacare decision, many companies already have insecurities about hiring decisions; one third of small businesses owners said in a survey that the new health-care law poses their greatest or second greatest obstacle to hiring new workers. Adding on additional barriers to entry will no doubt increase the already disastrous trend of lower employment.

But what of the 99%? How would they be affected by the increase in minimum wage? Manning explains that they would be disproportionately and negatively hit: Read More

The Service Employees International Union, freshly returned from fighting the right of employers to give employees raises, have finally come up with their own proposal for increasing wages for employees- raising the minimum wage: Raising the minimum wage is an important step toward an economy that works for everyone, not just the richest 1%. That’s […]

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