1

SEIU Harasses Care Provider and Elderly Client

Dirty tactics

An experienced personal care assistant in Connecticut, along with her very elderly client, is being harassed by SEIU because the woman refused to join the union.

Pauline has worked as a personal care attendant for more than 20 years through different non-profit agencies. Despite her experience, this past June she had to attend a state-mandated PCA orientation or risk losing her job…

Part of the orientation is a 30-minute “union-only” session of the training, during which members SEIU 1199 organizers discuss workers’ rights and the benefits of joining a union. The union then tries to get PCAs to sign union cards to join the SEIU 1199 and start paying dues.

Pauline refused to sign the card and that was when the trouble started.

“They started calling two, three times a day,” Pauline said. Individuals who would not give their names asked her why she didn’t sign the card. “They’re calling at 10 o’clock at night. That is not the way you approach people,” Pauline said.

What’s worse – and possibly dangerous – is that the phone calls are not going to Pauline’s personal phone but rather the home of her 89-year-old client, who recently suffered two strokes. “I said, ‘You’re waking up the client, stop!’ Then they hung up the phone again.”

Pauline said her client attempts to get out of bed and answer the phone by herself, which could be dangerous because she is unable to walk unassisted. Pauline also has no idea how the pro-union callers got the phone number of her client. “They’re scaring her,” Pauline said…

Pauline claims other PCAs have experienced similar situations but are afraid they will lose their jobs if they come forward. Some have threatened to call the police. “This is harassment,” she said.

yankee institute

An experienced personal care assistant in Connecticut, along with her very elderly client, is being harassed by SEIU because the woman refused to join the union. Pauline has worked as a personal care attendant for more than 20 years through different non-profit agencies. Despite her experience, this past June she had to attend a state-mandated […]

0

Seattle Weekly Opposes SEIU Initiative

Dirty tactics

The paper’s editorial board opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to the union or pay dues to it.

This measure, written and sponsored by SEIU, purports to be about protecting seniors from fraud. But that’s not really the case. This is: In 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in Harris v. Quinn that caregivers who were receiving state Medicaid dollars for their work could not be considered state employees, and thus could not be forced to join state-employee unions. The liberals on the court rightly decried this decision, since it ignored the fact that caregivers’ wages are set by the states, and in states like Washington those wages were set through negotiations with a union. Thus, caregivers could legally not pay dues while still benefiting from the work of the union. Knowing that such freeloading cuts at the very foundation of organized labor, the Olympia-based anti-union group Freedom Foundation used the state’s Public Records Act to get the names and addresses of all home-health-care workers in the state represented by SEIU and informed them of their right to not pay dues. SEIU has a legitimate grievance with this situation. However, their proposed solution—I-1501—is ill-advised. I-1501 would exempt caregivers’ names and addresses from the public disclosure laws so as to prevent the Freedom Foundation from contacting them. The Pro-I-1501 campaign frames its initiative as a way to protect seniors (and their caregivers) from fraud; to that end, along with changing the PRA, it increases the punishment for bilking seniors. That’s a good talking point, but it’s also a smokescreen. Restricting the flow of state information to prevent people from knowing their rights is a dangerous precedent Washington voters should not be tricked into setting. Vote no, and let’s figure out other ways to help unions thrive in the state.

seattle weekly

The paper’s editorial board opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to the union or pay dues to it. This measure, written and […]

0

Liberal Publication Opposes SEIU Initiative

Dirty tactics

The publication’s editorial board opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to the union or pay dues to it. Of course, rather than being honest about the purpose of the initiative, the union disguised it to appear to be about protecting the elderly from identity theft.

Proponents of this initiative want you to think it’s about keeping old people safe. We’re not sure how the SECB would have voted if the measure were really about protecting the elderly… But luckily we didn’t have to find out! That’s because this thing is really about something other than keeping old people safe: an endless grudge match between two crazed interest groups, the Service Employees International Union … and … the Freedom Foundation…

The Freedom Foundation has been trying to contact Washington health care workers to tell them about a court ruling that said Medicaid-funded health aides don’t have to pay their union dues. To do that, they want the state to give them a list of those aides. SEIU, unsurprisingly, wants to stop the Freedom Foundation from contacting its members. So the union has tried to get this information exempted from state public-disclosure rules. They’ve lost in court and in the state legislature, and now they’re taking it to the ballot under the guise of protecting the elderly. To that alleged end, I-1501 would prohibit the release of the names of home-health-care workers—workers who, by the way, are paid with public dollars. (It would also increase the punishment for identity theft against seniors, but, again, that’s not really the point of this thing.)

… I-1501 is a bad idea. This initiative would chip away at our state’s strong public-disclosure laws and lock information about publicly funded employees out of public view. While it includes some limited exemptions, like one for “a bona fide news organization that requests such information to conduct an investigation into, or report upon, the actions of such specific public employee(s),” that’s simply not good enough.(And we’re not sure “bona fide news organization” applies to The Stranger, so there’s that, too.)

SEIU’s initiative is a bad idea masquerading as concern for your grandma… Also, this exact same fight between SEIU and the Freedom Foundation is playing out before the state supreme court as we type. Let the high court figure this one out… Vote no.

the stranger

The publication’s editorial board opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to the union or pay dues to it. Of course, rather than […]

0

The Spokesman-Review Opposes SEIU’s Initiative

Dirty tactics

The editorial board of The Spokesman-Review, one of the largest newspapers in the State of Washington, opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to the union or pay dues to it. Of course, rather than being honest about the purpose of the initiative, the union is trying to disguise it as a measure to protect the elderly from identity theft.

A libertarian think tank wants to contact home-health-care workers to let them know they have the right to leave their union and stop paying dues, thanks to a 2014 U.S. Supreme Court ruling. The union, Service Employees International Union, doesn’t like this, so it wants an exemption to the Public Records Act that would keep workers’ information under wraps.

That’s the back story of Initiative 1501, which would give seniors and other vulnerable adults more protections against identity theft while altering the public records law. SEIU and the Freedom Foundation have been waging this fight for two years. The initiative’s added protections for seniors look to be sweetener to achieve the real goal.

The American Association of Retired Persons says there are ways to protect seniors without touching the public records law. AARP will be advocating for a bill in the Legislature. That’s a better way to go, so vote no.

spokesman-review 2

The editorial board of The Spokesman-Review, one of the largest newspapers in the State of Washington, opposes SEIU’s initiative designed to keep the Freedom Foundation from getting a list of SEIU’s caregiver members. The union opposes the foundation’s efforts to inform union members that the Supreme Court decided that they do not have to belong to […]

0

Misleading

Dirty tactics

the daily callerSEIU distributed misleading flyers in Nevada that encouraged people to support Hillary Clinton. The flyers mentioned she had “spoken out in support of the movement for $15 and a union,” but they neglected to mention that she does not support a $15 national minimum wage.

A major Nevada union has been distributing misleading flyers that state Democratic presidential candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton supports the $15 minimum wage, according to reports Saturday.

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) has been one of the main advocates for the $15 minimum wage. Despite its support for the policy, the union decided to endorse Clinton, who argues the federal minimum wage should not exceed $12 an hour. SEIU Nevada left out her opposition to the national $15 minimum wage when it distributed flyers touting her support.

“Hillary Clinton will fight, deliver and win a better future for working families,” stated the flyer, first reported on by Politico. “Clinton has spoken out in support of the movement for $15 and a union.”

The flyer includes a number of select quotes showcasing how Clinton has been an advocate for the policy. It leaves out that she actually is opposed to the national minimum wage exceeding $12 an hour. She only supports states and cities going as high as $15 if they so choose. Her primary rival Sen. Bernie Sanders, however, has been vocally supportive of a $15 national minimum wage.
the daily caller

SEIU distributed misleading flyers in Nevada that encouraged people to support Hillary Clinton. The flyers mentioned she had “spoken out in support of the movement for $15 and a union,” but they neglected to mention that she does not support a $15 national minimum wage. A major Nevada union has been distributing misleading flyers that state Democratic presidential […]

0

Large Oregon Paper Questions SEIU’s Actions

Dirty tactics

the oregonianThe largest newspaper in Oregon is questioning SEIU’s decision to continue collecting dues from a woman who has resigned from the union. Although the union will start accepting dues at any time, there is only a two-week window each year during which the union will allow members to revoke their authorization for the collection of dues.

One such [home care] worker is [Maryann] Rose, who in February 2014 – months before the Supreme Court’s decision – signed an SEIU membership application that permits the deduction of dues from her paycheck, according to a federal lawsuit filed on her behalf last week by the Freedom Foundation. So far, no problem. But the application contained a provision making the deduction authorization “irrevocable for a period of one year from the date of execution and from year to year thereafter.” To revoke her authorization, Rose was required to send the union a written notice during a 15-day window that opened only once per year on the anniversary of her authorization’s execution.

Given the ease of signing up for membership and the difficulty of stopping dues payments, you have to wonder whether the SEIU consulted the playbook used by people who peddle cell-phone contracts. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

…Harris v. Quinn gave home care workers like Rose the ability to save money by canceling their union memberships and ceasing dues payments. And that’s exactly what Rose tried to do, according to the suit, which was filed in federal court Friday.

In November 2015, Rose sent the union a letter resigning her membership and asking that deductions for dues cease. She received a letter from the union in December confirming the resignation of her membership in SEIU. However, the letter continued, “deduction of dues will continue until such time as you revoke the dues check off authorization you signed … in the manner and in the time periods set out in that authorization.”

According to Freedom Foundation attorney Nick Dagostino, the deductions had not ceased as of early February, notwithstanding the fact that Rose is no longer a member of the union. This behavior is illegal, he argues. If unions may not collect fees in lieu of dues from nonmembers, why would it be OK for them to collect dues from nonmembers?

Heather Conroy, executive director of SEIU Local 503, declined in an email to discuss the lawsuit, except to call the Freedom Foundation “an organization dedicated to dismantling unions like SEIU” and to dismiss its chances in court.

Time will tell whether Conroy’s legal prognostication is correct, but her union’s treatment of Rose (and, according to Dagostino, many other workers like her) speaks volumes about its respect for the very workers it represents. Shouldn’t it be just as easy to quit a union and stop paying dues as it is to join and start?

 

the oregonian

The largest newspaper in Oregon is questioning SEIU’s decision to continue collecting dues from a woman who has resigned from the union. Although the union will start accepting dues at any time, there is only a two-week window each year during which the union will allow members to revoke their authorization for the collection of […]

0

Oregon Paper Questions SEIU’s Actions

Dirty tactics

the oregonianThe largest newspaper in Oregon is questioning SEIU’s decision to continue collecting dues from a woman who has resigned from the union. Although the union will start accepting dues at any time, there is only a two-week window each year during which the union will allow members to revoke their authorization for the collection of dues.

One such [home care] worker is [Maryann] Rose, who in February 2014 – months before the Supreme Court’s decision – signed an SEIU membership application that permits the deduction of dues from her paycheck, according to a federal lawsuit filed on her behalf last week by the Freedom Foundation. So far, no problem. But the application contained a provision making the deduction authorization “irrevocable for a period of one year from the date of execution and from year to year thereafter.” To revoke her authorization, Rose was required to send the union a written notice during a 15-day window that opened only once per year on the anniversary of her authorization’s execution.

Given the ease of signing up for membership and the difficulty of stopping dues payments, you have to wonder whether the SEIU consulted the playbook used by people who peddle cell-phone contracts. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

…Harris v. Quinn gave home care workers like Rose the ability to save money by canceling their union memberships and ceasing dues payments. And that’s exactly what Rose tried to do, according to the suit, which was filed in federal court Friday.

In November 2015, Rose sent the union a letter resigning her membership and asking that deductions for dues cease. She received a letter from the union in December confirming the resignation of her membership in SEIU. However, the letter continued, “deduction of dues will continue until such time as you revoke the dues check off authorization you signed … in the manner and in the time periods set out in that authorization.”

According to Freedom Foundation attorney Nick Dagostino, the deductions had not ceased as of early February, notwithstanding the fact that Rose is no longer a member of the union. This behavior is illegal, he argues. If unions may not collect fees in lieu of dues from nonmembers, why would it be OK for them to collect dues from nonmembers?

Heather Conroy, executive director of SEIU Local 503, declined in an email to discuss the lawsuit, except to call the Freedom Foundation “an organization dedicated to dismantling unions like SEIU” and to dismiss its chances in court.

Time will tell whether Conroy’s legal prognostication is correct, but her union’s treatment of Rose (and, according to Dagostino, many other workers like her) speaks volumes about its respect for the very workers it represents. Shouldn’t it be just as easy to quit a union and stop paying dues as it is to join and start?

the oregonian

The largest newspaper in Oregon is questioning SEIU’s decision to continue collecting dues from a woman who has resigned from the union. Although the union will start accepting dues at any time, there is only a two-week window each year during which the union will allow members to revoke their authorization for the collection of […]

0

Racketeering Case against SEIU Will Proceed

Dirty tactics

business wireA federal judge has denied a motion to dismiss a racketeering case against SEIU and two of its affiliates for the second time.

In a setback for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and two local affiliates, the unions’ motion seeking dismissal of a federal RICO [Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act] suit against them has been denied.

On Oct. 10, 2012, HealthBridge Management, LLC and CareOne Management, LLC, and others jointly filed the RICO suit, claiming that the unions deemphasized traditional labor relations in favor of a coordinated corporate campaign involving extortionate threats and acts of mail and wire fraud. Late last week, a federal judge denied a motion by the SEIU, United Healthcare Workers East, SEIU, 1199 (UHWE) and New England Health Care Employees Union, District 1199, SEIU (NEHCEU), to dismiss the RICO suit.

This follows a decision in 2013 rejecting the UHWE and NEHCEU’s motion to dismiss the case in its entirety and allowing certain claims under RICO to proceed. The case is being heard by United States District Judge for the District of New Jersey…

In their October 2012 statement announcing the RICO suit, the two companies stressed that they have worked cooperatively with unions in the past and fully respect and embrace the collective bargaining process. They said the suit is not about collective bargaining or other traditional labor activity but instead involves what they claim is a campaign of extortionate demands and myriad unlawful tactics used against the companies by the unions.

business wire

A federal judge has denied a motion to dismiss a racketeering case against SEIU and two of its affiliates for the second time. In a setback for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and two local affiliates, the unions’ motion seeking dismissal of a federal RICO [Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act] suit against them […]

0

Fraud

Dirty tactics

watchdog newsFirst, SEIU tried harassing an elderly personal care assistant to get her to join their union. When that didn’t work, someone apparently forged the Minnesota woman’s signature, and the union started collecting dues from her. After she complained to SEIU that dues were being deducted from her checks without authorization, SEIU sent her a copy of an organizing card with a signature that she says is different from her own.

Home-care worker Patricia Johansen isn’t a fan of unions. Never was.

So it didn’t take much — $76.67, exactly — for the Fergus Falls grandmother to take on the Service Employees International Union.

She alleges someone signed her name on a union card authorizing dues be taken from her paycheck. The 74-year-old personal care assistant. who tends to her daughter’s two special needs children, demanded — and got — her money back.

“I called them and said I never signed any papers to join the union,” Johansen said about her first call to SEIU in St. Paul. “… And he said, ‘We have your signature right here.’ And I said, ‘Well, you need to prove it because I didn’t sign anything. You send me a copy of it.’”

Union officials sent Johansen a copy of a SEIU organizing card dated May 3, 2014, with what appears to be her signature at the bottom. The card committed Johansen to supporting an election over whether to establish a union for home-care workers and to paying dues for at least one year.

Johansen says she never saw — much less signed — any such card.

“He sent me a copy of what I supposedly signed, and it doesn’t look anything like my signature at all,” Johansen said. “I’m left-handed, the letters are all formed differently. So they didn’t have my signature. Somebody else just signed my name to it.”

SEIU organizers approached Johansen about the union election in 2014, and she turned them away.

“Before they voted to bring in the union, they came to my door twice, and I wouldn’t let them in,” Johansen said. “I just said, ‘No, I’m just not interested,’ and I wouldn’t let them come in, and then they kept calling me.”

watchdog news

First, SEIU tried harassing an elderly personal care assistant to get her to join their union. When that didn’t work, someone apparently forged the Minnesota woman’s signature, and the union started collecting dues from her. After she complained to SEIU that dues were being deducted from her checks without authorization, SEIU sent her a copy […]

0

Who’d Want These People Running Their Union?

Dirty tactics

las vegas review-journalIn Nevada, an SEIU local president quit abruptly citing “an unhealthy and often toxic work environment.” The general counsel also resigned. These two resignations are just the latest in a string of resignations and terminations at the union.

Two top staff members — including the president — at Clark County’s largest union resigned effective Friday.

Martin Bassick, who was elected president of the Service Employees International Union Local 1107 in July 2013, on Friday sent a letter to all SEIU members informing them of his sudden resignation. Kathy Collins, who was recently hired as general counsel for the SEIU, also resigned effective Friday after only months on the job…

“My reason for resigning is due to an unhealthy and often toxic work environment,” Bassick wrote in his letter. “Our members are facing real issues… yet our organization often focuses on personal agendas instead of what is important to our members.”

All of the original director-level senior staff resigned under Bassick’s tenure and at least five union staff members were terminated in the last four months, according to a former union employee…

Bassick said that there are some internal structural and cultural issues that need to be worked out with the union, but declined to be more specific. He later said that the union has very passionate people, but when there’s heated debates, people need to talk issues through and not yell at each other and point fingers.

In his letter, Bassick said he’s spent the last two years trying to turn the organization around to no avail. Deficiencies within the local union’s constitution and bylaws have also resulted in an inability to self govern, he said.

“Somehow the SEIU Local 1107 has lost sight of working for our members’ common good and let internal politics take center stage,” he wrote. “Playing politics with our Union is not OK…”

las vegas review-journal

In Nevada, an SEIU local president quit abruptly citing “an unhealthy and often toxic work environment.” The general counsel also resigned. These two resignations are just the latest in a string of resignations and terminations at the union. Two top staff members — including the president — at Clark County’s largest union resigned effective Friday. […]

UA-23878307-1