Inflating the Numbers

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the hill 2SEIU’s tax day protests appear to have fallen far short of claims.

It has been over a week since the SEIU-backed protests against fast food brands. Unions used tax day as their backdrop, with the goal of drawing attention to a two-year-old rallying cry of labor groups for a more, “livable, hourly wage.”  Many of the protestors were union-backed and paid to be there, few actually workers in the fast food industry.

The “Fight for $15” campaign had announced protests in more than 200 cities, but activity appeared to top out at around 70 cities.  The protests followed a similar “script” as previous days of action with workers and far more non-employee agitators chanting and waving signs with many of the larger cities experiencing acts of civil disobedience, disruption of street traffic, and protesters entering store locations…

According to reports filed with the U.S. Department of Labor, the SEIU has invested at least $50 million into the fast food campaigns over the last two years.

That’s a huge amount of money to spend smearing the reputations of fast food brands while failing to organize not one of the 3.6 million workers employed in the fast food industry. Millions of dollars have been spent on this faux grassroots campaign purportedly led by workers. The SEIU had dumped tremendous amounts into social media ads, PR firms, paid protesters, and even the t-shirts and signs worn and held by activists…

Traditionally, unions have focused the brunt of their treasuries on activities directly related to servicing existing members and gaining new members…

It has been reported that members of the SEIU are “grumbling” about a lack of return on investment – which means actually turning protestors into dues paying union members…

Just how long will members stomach a huge investment that until now has fallen short of the union’s bloated promises?

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